bcc:, blame, time sink

from Catch a new iOS game by Andy Bergmann.
from Catch a new iOS game by Andy Bergmann.

Avoid the Nightmare of the Email Blind Carbon Copy (BCC). SkipPrichard.com October 30, 2014

Complaining About Cell Phone Usage Makes You Sound Ridiculous TheFutureBuzz October 24, 2014

Catch: The Addictive New Game By A Graphic Design Guru  FastCoDesign.com October 27, 2014

The first because it’s an awful habit that multiplies the madness inherent in email.
Some email facts here.

The second because we were isolated before we had devices to blame.

The third because it combines the time sink of the first with the devices in the second.

(Michalko)

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If you’re a CEO you actually run a dictatorship

original article
In Conversation Marc Andreessen

NYMag.com October 2014 via The Browser
The Netscape creator turned Silicon Valley sage on why optimism is always the safest bet.

This is a long-form interview. A fun, occasionally challenging read. I have enjoyed Andreesen’s thinking ever since he left Netscape behind. At that point he elevated and has lots to say about lots of things. Like this:


Q: It’s the “China for a day” thing. If you could just be an autocracy for one day, fix all the problems, and then go back to democracy.

A: This is a long-running view that business has held. And the reason is, if you’re a businessperson, especially a CEO, you actually run a dictatorship. But businesses and governments are different, in my belief….


His blog now long abandoned was a favorite. (Michalko)

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Most innovative companies 2014? Ask the CEOs

original article

Radical Innovation, Part II: Managing the Unmanageable
Knowledge@Wharton October 29, 2014

from bcgperspectives.com
from bcgperspectives.com

This is a brief video accompanied by a downloadable .pdf transcript of an interview with the Boston Consulting Group principal who produces their annual list of most innovative companies. Contrary to a lot of the rhetoric about how innovation is everybody’s job she observes “What we often find in some companies that aren’t very good at innovation is that new product development is a piece of everybody’s job, as opposed to being some people’s full time job.”

You might want to go right to the BCG site to see their full reporting titled The Most Innovative Companies 2014: Breaking Through Is Hard to Do And you should definitely take a look at their interactive guide to the list. A fun visualization of companies moving up and down over time. Check out Starbucks fall from innovative grace. And in an unsettling echo of the various academic department rankings this list is produced mostly by asking CEOs to name innovative companies in their industry. ” If executives believe other executives are innovative then they end up on the list” (Michalko)

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A proper …pedia origin story

original article

The Improbable Story of the Online Encyclopedia
Farnum Street November 3, 2014

 

CC-BY-SA-3.0 from Wikimedia Commons
CC-BY-SA-3.0 from Wikimedia Commons

Walter Isaacson who wrote the Steve Jobs Biography is out with a new book, The Innovators, which recounts the story of the people who created the Internet. In this post Shane Parrish prints and comments on a substantial excerpt describing the origin story of Wikipedia. It might get you interested in reading the rest of the stories.

I’ve heard the Wikipedia story in a variety of fractured ways so this exposition by such a good writer was captivating (and brief enough). NuPedia. Who knew?
(Michalko)

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It’s lots more than artificial intelligence

original article

Big data’s big ideas
O’Reilly Radar October 28, 2014

Ben Lorica does a nice inventory of the big topics that are shaping the data landscape. Tools have improved, deep expertise is not a requirement and communities have formed to share best practices. From cognitive augmentation to artificial intelligence, here’s a look at the major forces shaping the data world.

This inventory does not so much explain the different areas as offer examples that demonstrate the scope of the area. So the ‘cognitive augmentation’ category lists and links you to tools that democratize analytics and, in the process, empower domain experts. Like Narrative Science. There’s an interesting section on Building a Data Culture which links to a good post about building a data science team. (Michalko)

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Burnout, Clowns and Kinnell

How The Most Successful People Conquer Burnout | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

What Do Clowns Think of Clowns? – Pacific Standard: The Science of Society

Galway Kinnell, Plain-Spoken Poet, Is Dead at 87 – NYTimes.com and The Paris Review appreciation

The first because a 26 year-old serial entrepreneur ought to know.

The second because clowns can be creepy, because it is Halloween in the US and because you want to know what The World Clown Association thinks.

The third one because Kinnell was as close as the 20th Century could come to producing a Walt Whitman. His work was forceful, spiritual, physical and sometimes amusing. (Michalko)

Galway Kinnell from  galwaykinnell.com
Galway Kinnell
from
galwaykinnell.com

 

3
Here come the joggers.
I am sixty-one. The joggers are approximately very young.
They run for fun through a world where everyone used to lay bricks for
work.
Their faces tell there is a hell and they will reach it.
- from The Tragedy of Bricks

 

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What’s it like today at ‘Bell Labs’?

original article

IEEE Spectrum October 24, 2014
Douglas Coupland Analyzes Alcatel-Lucent in Kitten Clone

from trueclassics.net
from trueclassics.net

You may not know Alcatel-Lucent, the sprawling multinational telecommunications company. As well as providing much of the wired and wireless networking infrastructure that supports the Internet, the company is also the corporate inheritor of the fabled Bell Labs, which invented critical technology such as the transistor, the laser, and the Unix operating system. A non-profit hired Douglas Coupland (he of Generation X coinage fame) to spend months in their facilities and write about what he saw. This transcribed podcast is an interview in lieu of reading the book.

A quick fun interview. It turns out the folks who invent the communications technology don’t think very much about what it will be used to communicate. Surprise. So Coupland gets a lot of credit for the Generation X phrase but there’s a spirited debate. I like that Wikipedia attributes it to photographer Robert Capa, a prolific creator of iconic images.  And what did Tim Berners-Lee have to say in response to “What about the internet surprises you?”(Michalko)

P.S. You can watch the cartoon here.

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Art makes you smarter. Kind of.

original article

from ja.wikipedia.org
from ja.wikipedia.org

The Impact of Museum Field Trips on Students
Createquity.com October 27, 2014

This article reports on a large-scale, randomized-control study about the impact of museum visits on children that was conducted at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (the result of Walmart fortune patronage). These are rare things in the arts field given restrictions on experimenting on kids and the subjectivity of so much related to the arts that this one is a big deal.

Fascinating but not unexpected stuff. Spoiler alert.
A visit boosts attentiveness to detail along with a bunch of other things like critical thinking. Scan this easy to take on article.Check out the paintings by Bo Bartlett used in the study. (Michalko)

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Let’s get some innovation in here quick

original article

Successful Innovators Don’t Care About Innovating
HBR blog October 22, 2014 via American Press Institute

Doug Sunnheim says successful innovators care about solving interesting and important problems — innovation is merely a byproduct. If this distinction seems like hair-splitting, it isn’t. The two focuses create vastly different realities.

This is a short piece with a good Sherwin Williams anecdote to animate the point. (Michalko)

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What does open source mean for biology?

original article

O’Reilly Radar October 23, 2014
Avoiding the tragedy of the anticommons

Mike Loukides reflects here in an essay from BioCoder on the potential for a bio-commons that holds biological intellectual property in trust for the good of all. Also reflected on is the tragedy of the anticommons, the nightmarish opposite of a bio-commons in which progress is difficult or impossible because “ambiguous and competing intellectual property claims…deter sharing and weaken investment incentives.”

This is worth your review because it is really about where and at what scale open source is impactful and even essential. It takes reflections about the patterns of open source software development and propagation and applies them to biological research. There’s interesting commentary about the tools supporting this research. We should care about this because we will have to steward these work products. (Michalko)

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